Texting While Driving Tickets

Cited for distracted driving in Anne Arundel County?

The state of Maryland prohibits texting while driving. Because this is a primary offense, law enforcement officers are allowed to pull drivers over and ticket them solely based on the fact that they were observed texting while driving. In contrast, secondary offenses require that drivers be pulled over only when they are also observed committing another "primary" traffic offense, such as speeding or making improper turns. Due to recent changes in Maryland law (effective as of October 2013), cell phone use without a handheld device (or simply holding a cell phone while driving) is now also primary offense, as opposed to a secondary offense.

Drivers who are accused of texting while driving are at risk of having to pay fines and having traffic convictions on their records. Furthermore, if texting while driving is considered to be a factor in an accident that results in someone else being seriously injured or killed, the criminal repercussions can become much more severe. If you are accused of committing the traffic offense of texting while driving, it is important that you have a knowledgeable attorney looking out for your best interests. At Trunnell Law, LLC, we have attorneys who serve the area of Crofton and Anne Arundel County, Maryland and are skilled in the area of criminal law. Our legal team can help you explore your options for challenging the allegations you are facing.

What are the penalties for texting while driving?

Texting while driving can include the acts of reading, writing or sending a text message or electronic message (using a text messaging device) while one is operating a motor vehicle, according to the Maryland Motor Vehicle Administration (MVA). For this offense, the vehicle must be in motion, or it must be in the area of the roadway that is intended for travel. Texting while driving is a misdemeanor, punishable by a civil penalty and a fine amounting up to $500. When minors are found guilty of this offense, they can end up having their driver's licenses suspended for up to 90 days, according to the Md. Transportation Code Ann. § 21-1124.1.

There are certain exceptions to the texting while driving ban, such as when the text message was used for the purpose of reaching the 9-1-1 system or for the use of GPS. Individuals who are found guilty of using cell phones without handheld devices are subject to penalties that are lower than those for texting while driving.

At Trunnell Law, LLC, we can help you build the appropriate defense plan for your texting while driving charges. We want to help you avoid having unnecessary traffic offenses placed on your record. Contact our legal team so we can assist you with your case. We have more than three decades of combined legal experience!

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